Thursday, January 22, 2015

Crafts to Make with Hymnal Pages


Yesterday I listed several vintage and antique hymnals in my Etsy shop, and I had a friend ask, "but what would someone do with an old hymnal...?"


Besides simply enjoying looking through it and being reminded of many of the traditional hymns that are no longer sung at church services, there are many wonderful ways you can repurpose them. In a way, repurposing will actually extend their "life." Something like an old hymnal that may be worn thin and have no value to most people can be turned into things that will be used and treasured for years to come. Below are just a few of the neat crafts I found on Pinterest that use hymnal pages.

One of my favorites, Miss Mustard Seed used old hymnal pages on a lovely dresser:

Music Sheet Dresser....I would like to do this with some of the old hymnals I have

On AJ's Trash to Treasure Blog, you can see that just about anything can get covered in hymnal pages, including lamp shades: 

10,7,10 CA projects110  SPECIAL HINT FOR LAMP SHADES:  Paper the INSIDE as well as the outside.  When the light shines through, all you seams and overlaps are OVERLY obvious.  By double layering your paper (one layer outside and one layer inside) it will minimize this.

The Picadilly Post turns hymnal pages in works of art:

I love this -- I think I would use the hymn 'The Old Rugged Cross' or 'In The Garden' or 'It Is Well With My Soul'...

Christmas ornaments seem like something doable even for the beginning crafter. These were found on Houzz

IDEA:  Hang on dining room window latches    in love with these diy cloth ornaments and color scheme for sun-room - all year

Use them to make a wreath. Here's a How-To from HomeTalk:

A Hymnal Page Wreath :: Hometalk

Here's an old blog post of mine where I used hymnal pages in a painting:


In my opinion the easiest and cheapest way to use hymnal pages is to simply frame them! In my home I have this framed song in our guest bedroom: 


Now let your imagination flow! 

Tips: You can link back to all sources. Hover in each introductory sentence to find the link.  If you are interested in purchasing one of the hymnals in my shop to use for a project, go HERE



Wednesday, December 31, 2014

A Twist on a Southern New Year's Menu


I am a girl who loves tradition. Love it. And apparently y'all do, too! My previous post on the Southern New Year's menu, along with the explanation of why we eat what we do, has been extremely popular. (thanks for that!)

And while we will be keeping to tradition this year with my New Year's Day dinner, I will also be changing it up a bit. I'm not going to repeat my previous post with all of the symbolism, so please go HERE if you need a refresher.

With this menu I'm still going to serve greens, black eyed peas, cornbread, and pork, just with a modern twist! So fun!


The black eyed peas will be used to make a hummus. (Mmm! I love hummus!) I found a recipe (here). Since I don't like black eyed peas, I usually only choke down (how ladylike) a few of these. So cheers to trying something new this year.

Black Eyed Pea Hummus Recipe

As for the greens, I'm going to make some kale chips. The flavor of the kale chips will go great with the hummus, but won't necessarily be sturdy enough to be a "vehicle" for it. These are super easy to make. You can even find bags of kale at the grocery store that come with seasoning packets. But basically all you need is some olive oil, salt, and pepper. For a recipe go (here). 
Crispy Kale "Chips"

For ham, I'm going to make some ham and Swiss sliders with King's Hawaiian rolls. Can.Not.Wait. To find the recipe, click (here). The only changes I'm going to make are that I'll be using some shredded Swiss that is already in the fridge, and since there will only be 4 of us eating, I'll cut the recipe in half or even 1/4. 

And finally, the cornbread is actually going to be our dessert. I found a cornbread pudding recipe that looks fairly simple, and I'm going to give it a go. You can find the recipe (here).
Cornbread Pudding

My predictions are that the kids will love the sliders and the pudding, but not so much the hummus or kale chips. They are pretty good eaters, but aren't always great at trying stuff that I make myself. (Please don't tell them that they often have kale in their smoothies and have absolutely no idea.)

I really hope that y'all have an awesome New Year. 

P.S. If you'd like to save this page for later, please click the Pinterest button at the top or bottom of the page. 



Monday, December 8, 2014

Natural Christmas Decorations


Christmas decorations inspired by nature can be very beautiful! Whether simple or extravagant, using natural elements is something easily done. Some materials that you may want to consider are fruit, pine cones, acorns, nuts, raw cotton, twine, jute, burlap, wood, berries, branches, feathers, and dried or fresh flowers. Here are just a few examples to inspire your holiday decorating. Tip: You can link back to all of the sources by clicking on the names.

This one from Better Homes & Gardens (click for link) looks very doable! Apples, pine cones, and evergreen branches. Did you know that most Christmas tree retailers will give you the cuttings for free? If you wanted to add a little something extra to those apples, try spraying them with a sheer glitter spray paint. Red apples would create a completely different feel, too.


There are so many ways to use pine cones in Christmas decorating.

One of ours:


 From Make It & Love It:

Over on the The Lettered Cottage you can see how a poinsettia gets updated in a metal bin and the raw cotton looks marvelous nestled into Layla's Christmas tree:



Another example of using raw cotton from Sophia's Decor. Her whole post is a great example of using natural elements such as pine cones, branches, birds, and cotton.




Classic and beautiful, check out this garland of dried oranges from Buckets of Burlap:

Here's an example of a more detailed and sophisticated use of natural elements from Southern Living. 


Look around at what's available outdoors (for free!) in your area. Simply filling a large clear vase with pecans, acorns, cranberries, or even evergreen stems will make a big impact.